• M is for (Data) Monkey

    M is for (Data) Monkey: The Excel book that will change YOUR life...
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    It may have a funny title, but this will be one of the most important Excel books you ever buy in your career.

    Written BY Excel pros FOR Excel pros, this book has been designed to guide you through learning how to master the new "Get and Transform" data experience in Excel. Released as a free add-in from Microsoft for Excel 2010 and 2013, Power Query technology is now built in to Excel 2016 and the Power BI Desktop application. This technology is a game changer, and will revolutionize the way you work with your data forever.

    Way back when this book was nothing more than a concept, we knew that it needed to be approached in a specific way. It had to speak to Excel users, the problems that they face on a daily basis, and ways to solve those problems both effectively and efficiently. It had to be written to keep you engaged, and to take you on a guided journey, learning from someone who understands you as an Excel pro, how you work, and what you face on a daily basis.

    We're proud to say that we believe that we've delivered on that goal, starting with common tasks you perform, and back filling them with real world issues, inspired by a wide variety of real world data sets. Packed with downloadable files and step by step instructions, this book is built to help you master Power Query so that you can use it in your own work, with your own issues. This book was designed from the beginning to get you up to speed quickly, and to give you the knowledge to build awesome Excel solutions quickly.

    What is in the book?
    These are some big claims, to be sure. So how do we do it? What will you find between the covers of M is for Data Monkey?

    We begin with the most common issues facing you on a daily basis:

    • Importing, cleaning and automating the refresh of data from your files
    • Dealing with common issues, including importing data with different date formats
    • Appending two or more data sets (from different files or from the same workbook)
    • Importing and appending the data from all files in a folder... easily!
    • Dealing with difficult data in the shape of non-delimited text files

    And that's just the first few chapters. Each technique is illustrated with real world problems that you face in your job every day, and generates real world solutions to those problems. Just these few chapters alone will show you how to connect, clean up and re-shape your data for consumption faster than you've ever been able to do before. And then, to top it off, you learn how to automate it all so that you can just click a button to refresh it next time you need it. And the best part? It's EASY!

    But that is far from all there is in the book...

    We show how to use Power Query to connect to and retrieve data from a database, and even illustrate how to connect to SSAS instances as well. But let's face it, not all Excel pros have access to these data sources. And if you don't? We even provide you with access to an online SQL Azure database, so you can still practice, and maybe even inspire the IT department to grant you the access you need.

    But in the meantime, we all know that data isn't all contained in nice databases, all ready to be used. In truth, it's far from that. , so we also show you how to connect to all of the following data sources as well:

    • Text and CSV files
    • Excel worksheets
    • Excel files
    • Web pages
    • Microsoft Exchange (do you know how much business data is stored in your emails?)
    • Other Power Queries

    Knowing each and every one of these sources is incredibly powerful, as this means that you can start linking your data from disparate sources. Using Power Query you can source data from multiple places, landing it in Excel and/or Power Pivot to build truly robust solutions.

    Of course, your data rarely every arrives in a nice, clean and ready to use format. For this reason, we also put a lot of focus on how to re-shape your data (dealing with issues ranging from easy to more complex.) Between the covers of M is for (Data) Monkey, you'll learn a variety of techniques for cleaning and re-shaping data, including (but not limited to) the following:

    • Un-pivoting data with only a few clicks
    • Merging tables together (with no VLOOKUPs)
    • Grouping and summarizing data
    • Transposing and un-pivoting complex data (because let's face it, life throws us really crappy data on occasion!)

    "Wow", you're thinking... "there's a lot in this book!" And there is, but we're only part way through the list. Everything illustrated to the point above is done using the built in user interface, clicking buttons. But we go deeper than the standard user interface... much deeper.

    The book includes five chapters dedicated to understanding and working with "M", the language that runs under the hood of the Power Query engine. While you don't need to ever learn this language, you'll find that if you do, you can build some incredibly diverse and robust solutions. For that reason, our chapters carefully guide you through the journey of learning this new language, and then applying this knowledge in useful scenarios. From learning basic Power Query formula structure, to implementing conditional logic and then a deep dive into Power Query language syntax, these chapters prepare you for creating custom functions in Power Query.

    And why are custom functions important? It's because they unlock these three amazing chapters that will change the way you work with your Excel solutions and Power Pivot data models:

    • Advanced Conditional Logic
    • Dynamic Parameter Tables
    • Dynamic Calendar Tables

    These are truly game changing techniques that will allow you to build robust and dynamic solutions quickly and easily. And that is the key. Other technologies may allow you to do some of the things listed above, but the time needed to learn these tools is immense. With Power Query you'll be skilled up and building in a fraction of the time.

    The impact is bigger than JUST Excel...
    M is for (Data) Monkey IS the Excel Pro's Definitive Guide to Power Query. Written by Excel Pros, for Excel Pros, but it's bigger than just Excel. Power Query technology is now being used as the default "Get Data" experience for not only Excel, but for Power BI Desktop as well. So the skills you learn in this book will not only help you Master Your Data in Excel, they are also portable to other emerging technologies as well.

    This technology is a game changer. And this book will get you there.

    Get your copy of M is for (Data) Monkey
    There are three ways you can get your copy:

    Buy a digital download copy direct from the author and get it RIGHT NOW
    Includes the PDF, mobi (Kindle) and epub(iPad and Kobo) files
    Add to Cart

    Get it for FREE when you register for our Online Power Query Training Course

    Buy a physical copy of the book from Amazon.com

    Let us help you change your life. Buy our book. Master Power Query. Master your data!

     

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    Comments 19 Comments
    1. alazyworkaholic's Avatar
      alazyworkaholic -
      Is the AdventureWorks2012 database at azuredb.powerqueryworkshop.com still up? Have the credentials changed?
      I bought the M is for (Data) Monkey book but I'm not able to connect with the credentials in Chapter 8.
      I am using the database (not windows) tab of the connection wizard as instructed, and I've made sure there are no typos.
    1. Ken Puls's Avatar
      Ken Puls -
      It is, and no, the credentials are still as written in the book. Maybe there was a temporary outage, or your company prohibits connecting to our site, but it should be working. If anyone else has this issue, please shoot us a note from the contact form, as we get notified of that immediately and will look in to it.
    1. alazyworkaholic's Avatar
      alazyworkaholic -
      Thanks for the reply. I got it to work! But there's a trick...

      I had tried to access the data using the credentials as written in the book. They still don't work.

      However, the "Info" tab of the "SQL Databases - Complete.xlsx" file in the "Ch08 Examples" folder informs both a different server connection and different database credentials! These work. So if anyone else has- the same trouble, just download the book files as informed at the end of chapter 0.
    1. Ken Puls's Avatar
      Ken Puls -
      Hey there,

      So we tested the book credentials and they do still work. I'm wondering if maybe you tried to use a capital "o" in the password instead of a 0 (zero)? (Miguel has had a couple of calls with that exact issue.)

      Let me know,
    1. carlosam14's Avatar
      carlosam14 -
      Hi Chapter 1 my query shows minus sign and 1 error after Close and Load...Why?
      Attachment 6936
    1. carlosam14's Avatar
      carlosam14 -
      Quote Originally Posted by carlosam14 View Post
      Hi Chapter 1 my query shows minus sign and 1 error after Close and Load...Why?
      Attachment 6936
      As can you see, for chapter 3, my pivot table show different values from book
      Attachment 6937
    1. Ken Puls's Avatar
      Ken Puls -
      Hi there,
      Quote Originally Posted by carlosam14 View Post
      Hi Chapter 1 my query shows minus sign and 1 error after Close and Load...Why?
      At this point in the book you should be seeing this error. It's actually related to the last row in the file that can't be converted into a date (a concept that we cover a bit later in the book.)

      With regards to the negative numbers, they are actually showing as text. If changing the type of that column results in errors, try to use the Change Type --> Using Locale and set it to English US as shown on page 24.

      Quote Originally Posted by carlosam14 View Post
      As can you see, for chapter 3, my pivot table show different values from book
      It looks like you missed the step on the bottom of page 27 to Remove Errors.
    1. carlosam14's Avatar
      carlosam14 -
      Quote Originally Posted by Ken Puls View Post
      Hi there,


      At this point in the book you should be seeing this error. It's actually related to the last row in the file that can't be converted into a date (a concept that we cover a bit later in the book.)

      With regards to the negative numbers, they are actually showing as text. If changing the type of that column results in errors, try to use the Change Type --> Using Locale and set it to English US as shown on page 24.


      It looks like you missed the step on the bottom of page 27 to Remove Errors.
      Thanks,
    1. carlosam14's Avatar
      carlosam14 -
      I read all the book, very nice read and I really enjoy all figures, congrats to Miguel and you for making this book. I do it the work and make, start from 0 each example then compare with your complete's file, all Ok. at this point My request (for continue learn) to you is: Can share with me, some more examples, to continue learn.

      Thanks
    1. Ken Puls's Avatar
      Ken Puls -
      Quote Originally Posted by carlosam14 View Post
      I read all the book, very nice read and I really enjoy all figures, congrats to Miguel and you for making this book. I do it the work and make, start from 0 each example then compare with your complete's file, all Ok. at this point My request (for continue learn) to you is: Can share with me, some more examples, to continue learn.

      Thanks
      Not readily built, no. But if you really want to learn, try answering questions in our forum. You see all kinds of interesting challenges there, and it will really expand your knowledge.
    1. Iloveexcel&excelloveme's Avatar
      Iloveexcel&excelloveme -
      Hi Ken,

      Love your book (got it 2 weeks ago from BookDepository.com)

      Anyway, I'm having some issue with Chapter 10, pg 91 "Connecting to the Data Model".

      Somehow when i click on "Query-Sales", i can't seem to click on 'edit'. Below is the screenshoot, not too sure if you're able to help me out

      Attachment 7013

      Appreciate your help
    1. Ken Puls's Avatar
      Ken Puls -
      Hey there,

      What version of Excel are you using? 2010 or something later?
    1. Iloveexcel&excelloveme's Avatar
      Iloveexcel&excelloveme -
      Hey, is 2016
    1. Ken Puls's Avatar
      Ken Puls -
      Ah, okay. That section is specifically targeted at Excel 2010, and not 2016. So you won't see this setup at all in Excel 2016.
    1. Iloveexcel&excelloveme's Avatar
      Iloveexcel&excelloveme -
      Opps, my bad. May I assume that Page 90 is to Load directly into Power Pivot for Excel 2016?
    1. Ken Puls's Avatar
      Ken Puls -
      Yes, that's correct. Pages 89-90 are for Excel 2013 and higher (including Excel 2016)
    1. Iloveexcel&excelloveme's Avatar
      Iloveexcel&excelloveme -
      ooh .... Silly me ... Thanks Ken
    1. razmochaev's Avatar
      razmochaev -
      Hi, Ken.
      The book is really great and helpful. Are there any plans for 2nd edition given that PQ has improved significantly?
    1. Ken Puls's Avatar
      Ken Puls -
      Hi razmochaev,

      I'm glad you're finding the book useful. There are plans for a second edition, although I can't comment yet on how soon that will happen. (But it will happen.)
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