Status of our Master Your Data Book

We are rapidly approaching November 1, 2020, which has been the latest release target for our Master Your Data book. This is the long-awaited second edition of M is for Data Monkey, the book that I wrote with Miguel Escobar.  I want to share an update with you as to why the book’s release is about to be pushed back – yet again.

Our Master Your Data book (new edition of M is for Data Monkey)

First, I just want to say that Miguel and I wish we did not have to do this.  We want to get this book into your hands and scheduled a big block of time in the summer to get this done.  Our challenge this time has not been around technology, so much as the same thing that has impacted virtually all of you this year: COVID.

What have we been doing, anyway?

From my side, I can tell you that I was away from home for over 155 nights last year.  I travelled a ton leading in-person training courses and speaking at conferences.  Returning to the office was dedicated to catching up on the things I had missed and trying to slot in a block of time to write was quite difficult.  And then, in March 2020, everything changed.  We hit a global lockdown, and I watched my business go from 100 to 0 in the span of one week.  Every single training contract cancelled or postponed; income flow gone.

In some ways, you would think COVID would be a blessing there… I mean look at all that free time, right?  But the reality is that I have a team of 5 people at Excelguru, and I need to pay them.  We had to pivot, and pivot fast in order to generate a new income stream to keep people employed, and this has been all-consuming since then.

We brought Matt Allington in as a partner for our Power Query Academy and rebranded the enterprise as Skillwave Training. Ever since then, we have been working on adding new content there.  During that process we have come to realize that our site hasn’t scaled from a one-course site to a multi-course site. Now we’re investing in trying to design and build a better structure for our entire site.  (No, no promises yet on when you are going to see that!)

How are we weathering the storm?

Now, I am pleased to say that all of my clients who cancelled or postponed have come back to us.  But even with the courses I’ve done dozens of times before, the commitment on my side for a one-day in-person course has now become one to two weeks of time. This is because I have to adjust it for an online format, shoot and edit the video, get it all uploaded into our LMS, and so forth.

I joke today that I am working double the hours for a fraction of the earnings… but at least I still have it better than most.  The reality for us – like many – is that 2020 has been a very hard year.  I am just super proud that despite all of these challenges, we’ve been able to scrape by.  I have been able to keep my entire team at their usual salaries.  It is tight, but we are making it work.

Of course, there are two authors for this book. And while Miguel’s story is somewhat different, it is also somewhat the same.  He has been scrambling to deal with his business challenges – working sometimes 20 hours per day – in order to meet his commitments.

Where are we at with the Master Your Data book?

The simple reality here is that we just do not have the time to be able to write the Master Your Data book.  Book writing has never been a lucrative business, we do it for the passion of sharing with all of you.  So we are trying to build our businesses back to the point where we can do that again.

I know what you are thinking: "COVID, Murder Hornets, and now this.  2020 sucks!"  Yes, it sure does.

Having said that, we were asked if we should just cancel the sequel.  Miguel and I both said no to this.  We have made commitments to many people.  We are very proud of M is for Data Monkey and we want to make sure you get the new volume that you have been waiting for.  While the Master Your Data book won’t be released in 2020, we hope that we can at least brighten your 2021.

What can we expect going forward?

Last week Miguel and I sat down (virtually) to work out our future plan.  We are both committed until the end of 2020, but feel that we should be in a good place to start writing by mid-January.  Here is our plan on how it is going to play out:

  • Mid-January (at the latest), we will begin writing.
  • We will deliver all chapters – once written – in draft form to active members of the Power Query Academy. (Yes, you will get a chance to review them before the general public.)
  • We will review comments and edits from the Academy members and incorporate as appropriate.
  • We will deliver chapters to our publisher as they are completed.
  • Our target completion date is March 31, 2021.

After that, there's time for page layout, copy editing, and a bunch of other stuff, but the Master Your Data book should be available from Amazon as of July 1, 2021.

Final Thoughts on our Master Your Data Book

Again, at the end of the day, we really wish that the book was being shipped to Amazon today.  We know that many of you have been waiting for this for a long time, and we very much appreciate your patience and understanding.  And if you have lost faith in us and you cancel your pre-order, we totally understand and accept that too.  We are committed to getting this in your hands, it is just taking us far longer than we had hoped.

Keep safe out there everyone.  We will come through for you.

Use Excel Tables to Filter a Power Query

A question came up in the Excelguru forums today about how to use Excel tables to filter a Power Query.  While Power Query can't read a filter from an Excel table natively, there is a cool little trick that you can do to flow that information through though.

Data Background

The data footprint I'm working with looks like this:

3 tables showing the original data, a table of just years, and the final output with all rows

The Data query is a fairly simple staging query, pulling the data from the Excel table on the left, setting data types, and loading as Connection Only.

The YearFilter query is a little more complicated, as it pulls the data, removes duplicates, and then drills down into the Year column (right click the header -> Drill Down), resulting in a unique list of the Years:

The YearFilter results in a unique list of years in Power Query

And finally the Sales Query, which - shown in an indented and 'colourfied' format thanks to MonkeyTools QuerySleuth - looks like this:

The M code of the Sales query shown in Monkey Tools

The important things to notice about this query are:

  • It references the Data query (no new data is added here)
  • The Filtered Rows step filters to include any item that is in the list generated by the YearFilter list
  • The Filtered Rows step had to be adjusted manually to add the List.Contains function
  • The [Year] column refers to the [Year] column of the Sales query (which flows through from the original data)

So What's the Issue?

We want to use the filter on the YearFilter table in Excel to filter our Power Query.  Unfortunately, that doesn't happen... despite a refresh, all the years are still in the worksheet after setting that filter:

Despite filtering the Excel table, the output isn't filtered

The challenge, when you are attempting to use Excel tables to filter a Power Query, is that Excel can't read the filter.  In fact, Power Query can't access any of the table's metadata about filters or the visible state of the rows.  It therefore brings in all rows from the table whether they are hidden or not.

Using Excel Tables to Filter a Power Query

The secret here is that we need a way to tell Power Query which rows are visible versus which are hidden.  Something we can do by leveraging the AGGREGATE function, since it has the ability to count only visible rows.

The formula I used was =AGGREGATE(3,5,[@Year]) where:

  • 3 indicates the COUNTA() function
  • 5 sets it to ignore Hidden rows
  • [@Year] points to the current row of the Year column

The weird part, if you've never done this before, is that all the visible rows in Excel will always show a 1. But look what happens when you filter to only a couple of years, then edit the YearFilter Query and select the Source step:Using AGGREGATE, Power Query lets us see the visible and hidden rows in the table Boom!  We can see which rows are visible (indicated with a 1) and which are hidden (indicated with a 0).  This now becomes a pretty easy fix:

  • Filter the Display column to 1

And you're done.  The rest of the query will still work, as it drills in to the list of years, so we don't even need to remove this new column.

And just like that, we can now use Excel tables to filter a Power Query:

Setting a filter on the Excel table now filters our Power Query

 

Update to Monkey Tools QuerySleuth

We've been kind of quiet here, but we're excited to announce that we've just published an update to Monkey Tools QuerySleuth feature.  It now contains an "tabbed" experience so that you can easily flip back and forth between queries, "pinning" the ones you want to see and compare.

The Updated QuerySleuth Interface

In this case you'll notice that I pinned The ChitDetails and ChitHeaders queries, then selected the Locations query from the left menu.

An image of the update to Monkey Tools QuerySleuth showing the new tabbed interface indicating two pinned queries and two modified queries

Why does this matter?  Did you notice that the ChitDetails and Locations tab names are both red?  That's because I made changes to both of them to update a data type... I can now hold onto those changes as I flip back and forth between JUST the queries I want to keep in focus.

Updating Multiple Queries

But now, of course, I want to commit my changes and force the data model to update to reflect those changes.  In this image, I'm doing just that, with three queries:

An image of the QuerySleuth prompting the user to ask which queries they want to save and refresh

And due to the selection pointed out by the arrow, each of these queries will not only get saved back to the Power Query engine, but a refresh of each query will be triggered as well.

So how do you get this update to Monkey Tools QuerySleuth?

This update to Monkey Tools QuerySleuth is available in Monkey Tools 1.0.7553.5975 or higher.  And it's available in both the free and Pro versions of the tool.  (Of course, you will still need a Pro version in order to actually save your queries.)

To try our free trial, head over to the Monkey Tools product page to download your copy.

If you already have Monkey Tools installed, it will automatically update within a couple of weeks, or you can request the update now by going to Monkey Tools -> Options -> Check For Update Now…

Creating Power Query Based Calendars

We’re super excited to announce that we have given the Monkey Tools calendar creator feature an upgrade.  In fact, it is so much of a power up, that this feature has graduated into its own full grown monkey!  We call it the Calendar Monkey.

In our initial version, the Calendar Creator would create the queries necessary to load a single column calendar of unique dates into the data model and add PeriodID columns for 364-day calendars like 445 and 13 fiscal periods.

The Calendar Monkey adds a couple of pretty powerful features to this original mix.  Let’s walk through the experience quickly to see what I mean.

Step 1:  Define the Calendar Boundaries

Step 1 screen of the Calendar Monkey, allowing you to choose your calendar type, the calendar start/end boundaries and year end

Not much has really changed here.  You can still:

  • Pick your calendar type (12 month, 13 month, 445, 454, 544), and define your custom year end (including a different month for 12 month calendars.)
  • Define a name for your calendar table query
  • Choose the load destination
  • Pick any valid date columns for the Start and End date of your data

These settings allow our monkey to build the calendar to dynamically span the entire range of your data on every refresh.

The only real difference here is that we’ve added a checkbox and a Next button.  (Notice that Create is still available, if you just want to accept the monkey’s default choices for the rest of the options you’re about to see.)

Step 2:  Choose Calendar Columns

One of the things that always bothered us about our original version is that it created the calendar’s Date column, but then left it up to you to add the different date formats that you wanted.  So we decided to improve that, as you can see here:

Step 2 of the Calendar Monkey screen provides a series of check boxes allowing you to specify which date format columns you'd like to add to your model

Our monkey pre-selects the most common date formats, but if you ever check/uncheck one, it will learn your preferred defaults and provide those next time you go to inject a calendar.  The columns shown dynamically react to your choices in Step 1 as well… if you use a Dec 31 year end for a 12 month calendar, you only need the first two columns – so that’s what the Calendar Monkey will show you.  If you have a custom year end (like Jun 30 or Sep 30), you may also want Fiscal columns, so the monkey provides those as options too.  And if you work with a 364-day calendar like a 445 variant or a 13 fiscal periods calendar… there is a final column of PeriodID’s that shows up in that blank spot too.

Step 3: Adding Relationships

Depending on your choices in Step 1, the Calendar Monkey will determine if you will be presented with this page or if it will be skipped.  If you choose to load your calendar to the Data Model (or Data Model & Worksheet), the monkey will list every date column loaded to the data model.  The purpose of this is simple; let you decide if your new calendar table should be linked to any of those columns listed.

For any columns you check, Calendar Monkey will do its best to create those relationships after loading your table to the data model.  (There are some things that can prevent the monkey from accomplishing this, such as creating an inactive relationship.)

Step 3 of the Calendar Monkey provides checkboxes for each date column in the data model, allowing you to declare which tables you'd like to relate your calendar table to.

Step 4: Creating the Calendar

Even though the Calendar Monkey has a lot of work to do when you click create, it also knows the value of good feedback.  For this reason, it will update you as to the progress as it completes all the individual tasks, as you can see here:

This screen shows feedback from the Calendar Monkey, letting you know what has been done, as well as what you need to do need.

Now unfortunately, there are a couple of things that the monkey is unable to do (thanks to a lack of security clearance with the Excel data model).  Rather than just ignore these essential tasks, however, it will tell you what needs to be done, with the exact steps to do so.

As a bit of a pro-tip here… you don’t actually need to close the Calendar Monkey window to take action on those steps… so keep it open until you’ve hopped into the data model and made the advised changes!  Of course, if you understand what’s happening, and know the steps you’ll need to take, there is also an option to automatically close the summary screen upon completion as well.

Looking at the data model with the new calendar table already related to the other tables

What the Calendar Monkey cannot do

There are three things that the Calendar Monkey can’t do at this time:

  1. Automatically hide the keys on the “many” side of the relationship (the foreign keys)
  2. Automatically create the sorting hierarchies to sort Month Name by Month Number and Day Name by Weekday Number
  3. Create the calendar in a Power BI file

Honestly, while we joked earlier that the Calendar Monkey doesn’t have security clearance, the reality is that there is a limitation with the data model’s extensibility model which is preventing us from solving the first two items.  The third… its on our backlog.

So how do you get the new Calendar Monkey?

You need Monkey Tools version 1.0.7493.29574 or higher, and you'll have the Calendar Monkey ready to do your bidding.

If you haven’t already, head over to the Monkey Tools product page to download a copy

If you already have Monkey Tools installed, it will automatically update within a couple of weeks, or you can request the update now by going to Monkey Tools -> Options -> Check For Update Now…

It’s (past) time to speak out

Earlier this week, in a private forum, one of my colleagues took a friendly joke thread and dropped a horrible MeToo joke in it. I was astounded, incredulous and disgusted. But I said nothing. Another MVP called him out, and today I discovered her blog post stating that she'd resigned from the MVP program.

I don't want to focus on (or even repost) the "joke". I want to focus on something that has equally bothered me - the way I handled it. With silence. And I'm devastated that my silence was in part responsible for her feeling the need to resign from the program. I've always counted myself as a silent ally of human rights movements, but have realized that a silent ally is no ally at all. Allies are allies specifically because they come to your aid during a time of need. And I didn't do that. Change doesn't happen via silence, and I need to do better.

The tech industry is dominated by men, who (in North America) are mostly white. Like me. And even though many of us in our group were uncomfortable with the "joke", no one spoke out to say "Dude, that was unacceptable." How hard would that have been? No, we left it to a woman to criticize a man who made a sexist joke. She was right to do so, but the added weight of my white male privilege would have gone a long way to back her and make our "space" feel safer for anyone else who was feeling uncomfortable. It shouldn't be necessary. It makes me angry that it even is, as I respect her greatly. Her voice should be enough to call someone out. But unfortunately, in the culture that we currently live in, things often need to be endorsed by a white male voice in order to gain traction. Any one of us should have stood up and said: "Yeah, what she said. That was brutal, and there is no place for that here." To empower people, to be an ally, we need to support those people brave enough to speak out - vocally - lest we leave them feeling even more vulnerable. And that goes for women's rights, LGBTQ rights, systemic racism, or any other human rights issue that is facing us today.

I failed this week. And I'm sorry. And I plan to do better.

Name Worksheets After Queries

Have you ever loaded a Power Query to a worksheet and then changed the name to match the query? It's a shame that there is no option to name worksheets after queries, as this would be handy.

Well, after seeing this request come up in the forums last week, we thought that this would be a great feature to add to the DestinationSleuth in Monkey Tools.  So as of build 1.0.7433.38066... it's done!

How to Name Worksheets After Queries

We wish that we could add this as an option in the Close & Load dialog, but sadly that's not possible.  So we did the next best thing...  Once you've loaded your queries, you simply need to open our DestinationSleuth and:

  1. Select the queries you're after
  2. Click the Rename Sheets button

Using DestinationSleuth to select queries and change the names of their host worksheets

At that point, we'll quickly loop through the host worksheets and rename them to match the query landed to that sheet.

Name Worksheets After Queries While Changing Load Destinations

You might also notice a new checkbox called "Name Sheets After Queries".  This checkbox allows you to name worksheets after queries while changing a load destination to create a new table.  It's also super easy to use:

  1. Select the query (or queries) you wish to change
  2. Choose to change the load destination to a Table
  3. Check the Name Sheets After Queries checkbox
  4. Click the Update Load Destinations button

Using DestinationSleuth to change a load destination from Connection Only to Table, and update the worksheet to the Query name at the same time.

We'll change the Load Destinations, creating the worksheets AND naming them to match the query in one step.

This is also a "Forever Free" Feature

As mentioned in my last post, while the DestinationSleuth's colour highlighting is only available in the trial and pro versions of Monkey Tools, the ability to Change Multiple Load Destinations at Once is a "forever free" feature.  And so is the ability to rename worksheets after queries!  All you need is Monkey Tools version 1.0.7433.38066 or higher, and you'll have that ability at your disposal.

If you haven’t already, head over to the Monkey Tools product page to download a copy

If you already have Monkey Tools installed, it will automatically update within a couple of weeks, or you can request the update now by going to Monkey Tools -> Options -> Check For Update Now…

 

 

Change Multiple Load Destinations at Once

Have you ever built multiple queries in one Power Query session?  You get to choose one load destination, then have to change each of the incorrect ones... one by one.  Have you ever wished you could change multiple load destinations at once?  Well now you can - you just need Monkey Tools!

Check out the New and Improved DestinationSleuth!

Following on the heels of last week's feature updates, we've added functionality to the DestinationSleuth that allows you to change load destinations of any one or more queries.

Naturally, DestinationSleuth still gives you a very visual view of the different query load destinations all in one place, but do you see that new option just to the left of the Exit button?

DestinationSleuth showing the different load destinations in colour

Assume that you've created 5 new queries in the workbook, and load them all to Connection Only.  But now you want to change 4 of them to the data model.  Rather than click each query, change the load destination, and wait, then move to the next one... Now you can just launch DestinationSleuth and:

  1. Select the load destination
  2. Select each of the queries you want to repoint (hold down your CTRL key)
  3. Click Change

DestinationSleuth being using to change multiple load destinations at once

Sure, it still takes time, but at least you can walk away and let it cook, rather than slowly shepherd it through the entire process.

Delete Host Worksheets

You'll also notice a little checkbox called "Delete Host Worksheets".  You know that issue where you accidentally load a table to the worksheet, then change the query to Connection Only?  It leaves the worksheet behind.  Now true, you can always just delete the worksheet (which will actually set the query to Connection Only automatically). But what if you need to change 5 of them?  It's easy with DestinationSleuth:

  1. Select the load destination
  2. Check the "Delete Host Worksheets"
  3. Select each of the queries you want to repoint (hold down your CTRL key)
  4. Click Change

We will repoint your queries AND remove the worksheets that were holding the query results.  (Naturally, you want to be really sure you acutally want to do this, but it's handy if you do.)

This is a "Forever Free" Feature

While the DestinationSleuth's colour highlighting is only available in the trial and pro versions of Monkey Tools, the ability to Change Multiple Load Destinations at Once is a "forever free" feature.  All you need is Monkey Tools version 1.0.7423.41125 or higher, and you'll have that ability at your disposal.

If you haven’t already, head over to the Monkey Tools product page to download a copy

If you already have Monkey Tools installed, it will automatically update within a couple of weeks, or you can request the update now by going to Monkey Tools -> Options -> Check For Update Now…

Monkey Tools Update Now Available

We’re pleased to announce the first Monkey Tools update is now available for download! This one contains a new feature, some new logic and an update to one of our data connectors. Read on for more information!

I can’t believe it’s been a month since our initial release, but here we are.  Since that release, a couple of notable things happened:

  • We published a blog post on PivotSleuth and Measure Tables. This was a learning experience for me, as I discovered something new about Measure Tables.  I always knew that you could mark your Fact tables as Measure tables by hiding all the unaggregated columns, but I didn’t realize that this also means that disconnected Measure tables will then suppress the “Relationships between tables may be needed error.”
  • One of my friends hit me with an interesting curve ball: he turned on “Store datasets using enhanced metadata format” in the Power BI preview features. And as it turned out, some of the methods we’d been using to analyze the Power BI model disappear when you do that.

Both of these have led to some improvements in the software, which we’re proud to say are finally available to you.

What’s new in version 1.0.7418.29970?

There are three major things that are new in this version:

A New Power BI Connector

This was actually a huge amount of work for us, as not only did we have to build a new connector to read the new Power BI file format, but we also had to analyze the file as it was opening to see if it was in the classic format or not.  And to make it harder, if you have the Enhanced Metadata Format turned on, a legacy file requires using our initial connector, but any refresh must be done with the new connector.  Fun times for a developer and, as you can imagine, it took as a bit of effort to pull it off.  It’s actually this piece that has held us back on the other features, as the connector MUST work and impacted everything.

While most of this work is invisible to the end user, there are two things that hope you do notice:

  • Connecting to the new file format is much faster than using the legacy format.
  • We also took the time to remove the reliance on configuring the version of Power BI that launches for you by default. We now just launch Power BI using your default connector, then bind to it, no matter how many versions you have on your machine, or which they are.

Updated Functionality in the PivotSleuth

As we learned in the PivotSleuth and Measure Tables blog post, hiding all unaggregated columns on a disconnected measure table flags the table as an official Measure table and suppresses the “Relationships between tables may be needed” message.  For that reason, PivotSleuth needed to recognize that this is acceptable.

In other words, when the Measures table is a properly formatted disconnected table, it needed to (and now does) show that there are no issues:

PivotSleuth giving a clean bill of health for a measures from a disconnected measure table

But when that disconnected Measures table has a visible column, not only should it have shown the issues, but also tell you what needs to be done to fix them.  And now it does:

PivotSleuth showing issues for measures used from an improperly formatted measure table

New QueryMonkey Feature: Add Measure Table

As mentioned before, our philosophy is “Build better, faster”.  For that reason we’ve added a new QueryMonkey feature for you:  Add Measure Table.

This feature will prompt you for a name for the table…

Prompting the user to enter a name for the new Measures table

And then create a new empty table in the data model for you:

An empty table in the data model

Unfortunately, the Excel team hasn’t given us a way to programmatically hide columns in the data model (we could REALLY use that ability), so we can’t take that last critical step for you:  Hiding the Measures column to prevent the "Relationships between tables may be needed" message.  But never fear, we do tell you exactly what needs to be done:

Advice from PivotSleuth on what to do to turn the new table into a proper measure table

So while we typically store our measures on the Fact tables, rather than a disconnected Measure table, we totally get that a lot of people like this approach.  Hopefully this make it a lot easier for you!

How do I get the Monkey Tools Update?

The answer to this depends on whether or not you’ve installed Monkey Tools yet.

If you haven’t, then head over to the Monkey Tools product page to download a copy

If you already have Monkey Tools installed, it will automatically update within a couple of weeks, or you can request the update now by going to Monkey Tools -> Options -> Check For Update Now…

Happy sleuthing! 🙂

Appending Columns with Different Names

Will Thompson from the Power BI team threw out a question on Twitter today related to Appending Columns with Different Names:

Let's say I have some CSVs coming in where the column names differ from file to file, but always in the same order. I could use PQ's automatic Column1/Column2 etc. names by skipping the header row and then have them all map to the same columns in AS.  Then build visuals on top of it that'll pick up the fixed column names from AS. Has anyone written a blog or tutorial that covers that sort of scenario? I want to point someone to some guidance…

No worries, Will, I’ve got your back. 🙂

Setting the stage

To be fair, the data source (CSV, AS, Excel or whatever), really isn’t relevant.  It’s all about the process of Appending Columns with Different Names.  What we need to recognize is that we need two types of tables here:

  • Data Tables: These tables have the data, but have different headers.
  • Header Table: This table has the correct headers for the data

And we also need to remember that the Data Table and Header Table columns are always in the same order.

Step 1:  Prep the “Data” tables

Preparing the data tables is pretty easy.  If the different column names are already showing in the headers like this:

A data table with headers

Demote and remove them by going to:

  • Home -> Use First Row as Headers -> Use Headers as First Row.
  • Remove Rows -> Remove Top Rows -> 1

Your table should now have headers called Column1, Column2, etc…

A data table with headers demoted into the first row

Do this for each table, then set each to be a staging query:

  • Excel: Load the query as a Connection Only query
  • PowerBI: Disable the Load of the query

Step 2: Prep the Header Table

Connect to your data, which might look like this:

A data table with headers

Clean it up by going to:

  • Home -> Use Headers as First Row -> Use First Row as Headers.
  • Keep Rows -> Keep Top Rows -> 1

You should now have a 1 row query that shows the names of the column headers.

A single row table with headers demoted to be the only row

It's time to save it:

  • Rename the Query as “Headers”
  • Set it to load as a staging query (as above)

Step 3: Combine the Data

This part is simple:

  • Right click the Header table -> Reference
  • Go to Home -> Append Tables -> Three or more tables
  • Add each of the data tables and click OK
  • Go to Use First Row as Headers
  • Set your data types

And you’re done:

A complete data table with the correct headers

Sample file (Excel) is available here.  But you can import it to Power BI if you prefer that look.

Monkey Tools is Here

We are super excited to announce that we’ve (at last) released the first version of our Monkey Tools software!  Ken has been working on this software on and off for the better part of 8 years now.  But after showing it to a friend in Wellington last year, we decided it was finally time to get serious.  We hired a full-time developer last summer and are finally ready to go live with the initial release!

What is Monkey Tools?

Monkey Tools is an Excel add-in (supported in Excel 2016 and higher) which provides tools for you - as a business intelligence author/reviewer - to:

  • Build models more rapidly
  • Follow recommended practices
  • Document your work
  • Audit files that you receive

It is targeted primarily at modelers and analysts who work primarily in Excel, but also push their models into Power BI.  (Our philosophy at Excelguru is to model in Excel first, then export to Power BI for reporting, sharing and security control.)

Oh, and super important… it installs on your system without requiring admin rights on your PC.  How cool is that?

What does Monkey Tools actually do?

Well… lots!  We’ve collected all the cool features under some themed buttons including:

  • QueryMonkey (for inserting new queries)
  • DestinationSleuth (to provide information on query load destinations)
  • QuerySleuth (helping understand your actual queries)
  • TimeSleuth (to benchmark query load times)
  • PivotSleuth (helping you diagnose Pivot Table field issues)
  • DAXSleuth (tools especially for working with DAX measures)
  • ModelSleuth (reporting on the properties of your queries and data model)

Cute names, right?  The Monkey builds things, and the Sleuths investigate things.  Here’s a high-level view of what they each contain.

QueryMonkey

Query Monkey gives you the ability to insert key queries like:

  • The famous “fnGetParameter” query and table (from Chapter 24 of M is for Data Monkey)
  • A “From Folder” setup that works with local and/or SharePoint hosted files
  • Dynamic calendar tables based on your data (for custom calendars, it even provides the option to insert the "periodicity" columns for Rob Collie's GFITW DAX pattern!)

The QueryMonkey provides a Dynamic Calendar generator

DestinationSleuth

Today, this is simply a viewer to visually indicate the load destinations of your tables (better than just “Connection Only” or “x Rows Loaded”).

The DestinationSleuth user form displays four different load destination types

QuerySleuth

This is a single form, packed with information and features such as:

  • A dependency/precedent tree view layout
  • Full colour display based on load destination
  • Colourful and indented M code
  • The ability to modify the M code and write it back to the editor WITHOUT LOCKING YOUR EXCEL User Interface!

The QuerySleuth shows a query dependency tree as well as indented and colourful M code

TimeSleuth

This feature allows you to time query execution in Excel, and even chart comparisons between them with or without privacy settings enabled.  If you’ve ever wondered which query is slowing down your workbook, or wanted to time test two different approaches, you may find this helpful!

A chart generated by Monkey Tools TimeSleuth user form

PivotSleuth

Have you ever seen that irritating “relationships may be needed” error when building a Power Pivot based Pivot Table, and wondered why?  Pivot Sleuth can tell you…

  • See the real, fully qualified names of the fields used in your Pivot Tables
  • Highlight potential or current issues in Pivot Table configurations
  • Debug cross filtering issues, “relationships may be needed” errors and errors where grand totals are returned for all rows on the Pivot Table

Debugging PivotTable errors with the PivotSleuth

DAXSleuth

We believe that measure dependencies are just as important as query dependencies, and this is the reason we build the DAXSleuth.  This form:

  • Displays a dependency/precedent treeview of your DAX measures
  • Provides a full colour display of Implicit and Explicit measures (with or without children), as well as Calculated Columns
  • Shows your DAX measures with colour highlighting in an indented format
  • Allows you to Indent, Un-Indent, Flatten, Duplicate and even Update measures without leaving the DAXSleuth
  • Exposes all locations a DAX Measure has been used (Pivot Tables, Pivot Charts, OLAP Formulae and Named Ranges), and even allows you to select those objects right from the DAX Sleuth!

Monkey Tools DAXSleuth user form in action

ModelSleuth

Have you ever had to provide documentation for your model?  Or picked up a model from someone else and had to review it?  The ModelSleuth provides reports and utilities such as:

  • A full model summary report showing key statistics about your tables, relationships, columns, measures and queries. (Trial and Free licenses are limited to every other record in this report.)
  • A model memory usage report, complete with how much memory is recoverable (for Excel based data models).
  • An unused columns report (for Excel based data models).
  • A DMV Explorer (for those who want to build their own reports).

Showing the impact of unused columns on memory via Monkey Tools ModelSleuth feature

Monkey Tools Supported File Types

The Monkey Tools add-in is compatible with Excel 2016 or higher, and can read from:

  • Excel files
  • Power BI Desktop files
  • Backup files (that you can export from the Monkey Tools software)

Will Monkey Tools get updates?

Oh yes, we have plans for many more features!

Our intended model is to deliver features (and bug fixes) as we develop them.  That means that there could be periods with no updates as we work on something big, or periods with multiple updates delivered in a single week.  We know that some people love frequent updates and some people don’t, so we let you control how often you get them:

Monkey Tools allows you to control update frequency

The key thing to recognize here is that we are not holding new features for a vNext. They’ll be delivered when they’re ready.

Can I try Monkey Tools before I buy it?

Ken did not become or remain a Microsoft MVP without contributing a large portion of tools and help to the community for free, and that won’t change.  Having said that, we’re paying a developer to work on this product full time and need to recoup those costs.  For that reason, we will always have both a Free version, as well as a Pro version.

Naturally, we want you to look at it, as we're convinced you'll like it.  And that's why we have a two-week trial that provides full access to almost all of the full feature set.  Once your trial expires, your license will automatically revert to a free license.  You’ll still get fixes and new features, they’ll just render in free mode (without colour, without field advice, etc.).  We do believe that you’ll still find the tool useful, just maybe not as useful without a Pro license.

Ready to learn more about pricing options and download the free trial?  Click here!