Protect Power Queries

How you protect power queries is a question that will come up after you've built a solution that relies heavily on Power Query, especially if you're going to release it to other users.

(This is a quick post, as I'm in Australia at the Unlock Excel conference, but still wanted to get a post out this week.)

Can you Protect Power Queries?

The answer to this is yes, you can.  It’s actually very easy, and prevents your users from not only modifying your queries, but adding new queries to the workbook as well. Essentially, it shuts the door on any additions or modifications to query logic, while still allowing queries to be refreshed… at least, it should.

So how do we Protect Power Queries?

To protect Power Queries we simply need to take advantage of the Protect Workbook Structure settings:

  • In Excel (not Power Query), go to the Review tab
  • Choose Protect Workbook
  • Ensure that Structure is checked
  • Provide a password (optional)
  • Confirm the password (if provided)

Once you’ve done this, the Power Query toolsets will be greyed out, and there is no way for the user to get into the editor.

image

Does refresh work when you Protect Power Queries?

This part kills me.  Seriously.

The answer to this question depends on whether or not you use Power Pivot.  If you don't, then yes, you're good to go.  As long as all your tables land on worksheets or as connections, then a refresh will work even when you protect Power Queries via the Protect Workbook method.

If, however, you have a single Power Query that lands in the data model, your stuffed.  If Power Pivot is involved, then the refresh seems to silently fail when you protect Power Queries using this method (and I don't know of another short of employing VBA, which is a non-starter for a lot of people).

It's my feeling that this is a bug, and I've sent it off to Microsoft, hoping that they agree and will fix it.  We need a method to protect both Power Query and Power Pivot solutions, and this would do it, as long as the refresh will consistently work.

Caveats about locking your workbook structure:

Some caveats that are pretty standard with protection:

  • Losing your password can be detrimental to your solution long-term. Make sure you have some kind of independent system to log your passwords so this doesn’t happen to you. And if your team is doing this, make sure you audit them so you don’t get locked out when as staff member leaves for any reason.
  • Be aware that locking the workbook structure also locks the ability for users to get into Power Pivot.
  • Workbook security is hackable with brute force macro code available on the internet for free. (Please don’t bother emailing me asking for copies or links to this code. I don’t help in disseminating code which can be used to hack security.) While protecting the workbook structure will stop the majority of users from accessing your queries, it should not be mistaken for perfect security.

‘DIY BI’ e-Book Launches Tomorrow!

Last week I announced that we are working on a series of free 'DIY BI' e-Books.  We've been hard at work on polishing it up, and I'm pleased to announce that the first DIY BI e-Book launches tomorrow!  It will be emailed at 9:00 AM Pacific Time to everyone on our newsletter list.

Sign up to get the free 'DIY BI' e-Book series

If you haven't already, sign for our mailing list to receive your copy!  You can do so at the bottom of this post.

Creating the 'DIY BI' e-Book

I'm really thankful that I have a team of people behind me for this.  For me, technical writing is actually the easy part.  It certainly takes time, don't get me wrong, but the magic of copy editing, proof reading and graphic design is a whole other story.

Deanna has done a great job of proofing the book, and making me re-write any paragraphs that sounded good in my head, but maybe didn't translate so well beyond that.  And Rebekah has done a phenomenal job on the graphic design and layout.

Each book will be themed as shown below:

image

Blue for Excel, based on the Excelguru website colour scheme.  Dark green for Power Query (like the powerquery.training site), light green for Power Pivot (like the Power Pivot logo) and yellow for Power BI like it's colour scheme.

The 'DIY BI' e-Book Cover

We wanted to create a cool cover, but most of the stock images for sale out there have a Mac in the picture.  Since 3/4 of these technologies won't work on the Mac, that plainly wasn't something we wanted to put out there.  So that led to us staging our own photo shoot to generate our cover - which I'll admit is a lot harder than I thought it would be.  Here's the finished cover for the first 'DIY BI' e-Book.

image

Our next e-Book will use the same cover image, but will be themed in the dark green of the Power Query series.

And yes, before you all ask, that IS a Pie Chart in the bottom left. And no, I don't love pie charts.  But sometimes you have to have one, because your boss asks for it.  (Just don't expect to find one INSIDE any of the e-Books!)  Smile

Reserve Your Free 'DIY BI' e-Book Now

If you're already receiving out newsletter, there is nothing else you need to do.  It will show up in your inbox shortly after 9:00 AM Pacific time on Apr 7, 2017.  If you're not on our newsletter list yet though, just sign up. It's that easy!

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Free ‘DIY BI’ e-Books

Today I wanted to just make a quick announcement that we are currently working on a series of free 'DIY BI' e-Books.

Free 'DIY BI' e-Books? Tell me more!

Over the past few years of working with Excel an Power BI, I've obviously picked up a few different methods, tips and tricks for working with the software.  And looking at how successful our free e-Book "Magic Tricks for Data Wizards" has been through the Power Query Training site, I thought it would be nice to so something similar for Excelguru readers.

One of the cool things about the Excelguru audience at this site is the diversity.  A lot of people originally came here for Excel, but we've been exploring Power Query, Power Pivot and Power BI for the past few years as well.  The one thing that ties us all together is that we are building "Do it Yourself Business Intelligence" or "DIY BI".

My original plan was to release one e-Book with 20 different tips, tricks and techniques; 5 each for Excel, Power Query, Power Pivot and Power BI.  After getting started, however, I realized that it was going to take me a bit longer to get that all done than I wanted.  But since I want to get information out to our readers, I've decided to break this down into four separate e-Books which will be collected under the umbrella of "DIY BI Tips, Tricks and Techniques".  Each e-Book will focus on one specific area of the DIY BI story.

What will the free 'DIY BI' e-Books include?

Well… tips, tricks and techniques, of course.  Smile  Okay, seriously, each is fully illustrated and written to give you some great examples and ideas that I hope will help you in your DIY BI journey.

Here is what is covered in DIY BI Tips, Tricks and Techniques for Excel:

  • The easiest formula to return the end of the month
  • Show a message when cells are hidden
  • Quick alignment of objects
  • Easy to read variances
  • Show a message if your Pivot data is stale

Sample image from DIY BI Tips, Tricks & Techniques for Excel

What areas will the free 'DIY BI' e-Books cover (and when will they be released)?

Those e-Books will be released in the following order:

  • DIY BI Tips, Tricks and Techniques for Excel
  • DIY BI Tips, Tricks and Techniques for Power Query
  • DIY BI Tips, Tricks and Techniques for Power Pivot
  • DIY BI Tips, Tricks and Techniques for Power BI

The first is already written, we just need to lay it out and make it look a bit more awesome.  Our target is to get it released by the end of next week.

With regards to the rest, I'll go as fast as I can on them, but as you can imagine, doing things right does take time.  I would expect that each will take 2-3 weeks to build out properly, but if I can get them out faster I most certainly will.

Am I going to need Excel 2016 to get value from the free 'DIY BI' e-Books?

No.  While I highly advocate being on a subscription version of Excel 2016, you'll find content in each of the first three e-Books which can be used in prior versions of Excel.

How do I receive the free 'DIY BI' e-Books?

You sign up for the Excelguru newsletter.  It's just that easy.  As soon as each e-Book is finished, we'll be emailing it to everyone who is currently subscribed to our newsletter.

And in the mean time, you also get a monthly email from us which now includes news about the latest updates to both Excel and Power BI.

Longer term, once all four e-Books are written, any new subscribers will receive the first e-Book upon signup, and then the next in the series will arrive every couple of days until you have the full set.

So what are you waiting for?  Sign up right here and don't miss out on free DIY BI Tips, Tricks and Techniques for your work!

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Job Opening for a Power BI Analyst in Florida

I received an email from a reader who has a job opening for a Power BI analyst in Florida.

A quick summary is that they are looking for someone with an excellent skill level in Power BI, DAX, M and scorecard/dashboard development.  They are willing to provide relocation to Florida or, if you are truly exceptional, they may also be able to let you work remotely or from a company office nearby (if one exists.)

If that sounds like you, and you either live in or are willing to relocate to Florida, you should check out and apply to their job posting here.

Display Last Refreshed Date in Power BI

One of my favourite tricks to use on a dashboard is to show the Last Refreshed Date.  This is important as it lets you know how stale your data is.  I think it’s even more important with Power BI, as it tells you if your automatic refresh is actually working!

Last Refreshed Date for Power Pivot

I’ve actually covered this topic in the past for Power Pivot solutions. You can find that article here if you’re interested.

Display the Last Refreshed Date in Power BI

Generate Last Refreshed Date with Power Query

Unlike the previous article, to work with Power BI, we need to generate the Last Refresh date ourselves using Power Query.  No big deal, it is as simple as this:

  • Open PowerBI Desktop
  • Get Data –-> Blank Query
  • Go to Home –> Advanced Editor and replace the code in the window with this:

let
Source = #table(type table[LastRefresh=datetime], {{DateTime.LocalNow()}})
in
Source

  • Click Done and rename the query “LastRefresh_Local”
  • Click Close & Apply

This code makes a nice little table that returns the current date and time each time we refresh the solution.

Create the Last Refreshed Measure

To finish it off, we need to create a simple measure and add it to our dashboard.

  • Go to your Report window –> New Measure –> Define it as follows:

Last Refreshed (Local) = FORMAT(LASTDATE(LastRefresh_Local[LastRefresh]),"mmm dd, yyyy hh:mm:ss AM/PM")

  • Now let’s create a Card visual to hold it:

image

So far everything looks really good here.  The card is formatted nicely, and I updates to the current date and time every time I hit the refresh button.  It’s a thing of beauty!  What could possibly go wrong with this?

Publishing to the Power BI Service

Encouraged with our visual, we’ll now publish it to Power BI:

  • File –> Publish –> Publish to Power BI
  • Login to the Power BI service and scroll down to the Datasets area

At this point you should click the little … to the right of the dataset you uploaded (whatever you called it) and click Refresh.  It will prepare for a bit, then should refresh.  If your experience is anything like mine, your report shows this:

image

At first, you think “Hey cool!” until you realize that this is the data – to the second – of your original upload.  So even after you refresh the data set, you need to refresh the report:

image

And when you do, you get this:

image

Um… WHAT?  That’s 7 hours different!  How is this possible?

So I’m in the Pacific time zone, which is currently UTC-7.  (We are UTC-8 when we are not on daylight savings time.)  So apparently the date that is showing here is giving me the UTC date.

This really sucks, obviously. I was really hoping that the dates and times would show based on my browser settings or something, but obviously not.

I tried a bunch of things to fix this, including forcing the column to a DateTimeZone data type, but that made the DAX formula choke, as it only accepts DateTime data types.  I tried various combinations using DateTimeZone.UtcNow(), DateTimeZone.LocalNow(), adding periods, subtracting them and more.  The killer though was that as soon as the time zone got removed (which is necessary for the DAX measure to work), Power BI displayed the time assuming it was UTC. So the issue I’m seeing here is that – no matter the DateTime you feed Power BI – it thinks it has the same time zone as the server.  Not so good.

How to Display the (Correct) Last Refreshed Date with Power BI

Just to be clear here, the title above is actually a heinous misrepresentation.  The timestamp was correct, it’s just being interpreted incorrectly by Power BI (but not Power BI desktop).  So I had to fake it out.

I reached out to Chris Webb for his thoughts, and he suggested hitting an API.  I’d already tried looking for a page, but picked up on this API which turned out to be quite useful:  http://www.timeapi.org  Even more interesting is that both www.timeapi.org/pst and www.timeapi.org/pdt return the same thing.  I’m hoping that this means it is going to allow me to survive daylight savings time with no adverse impacts…

So armed with that, I decided that the only way I was going to get this to work was to pull back the UTC offset, and add it to my date.  That effectively returns a bogus date that Power BI will represent in UTC to match my time zone.  Complicated, no?

Collecting the Current PST Date/Time

I don’t think I’m going to clearly document all the steps for this, as that would make this article really long.  Instead, here’s how you can implement this:

  • Create a new Blank query and paste this code in the Advanced Editor

let
Source = Web.Page(Web.Contents("http://www.timeapi.org/pst")),
Data0 = Source{0}[Data],
Children = Data0{0}[Children],
Children1 = Children{1}[Children],
#"Removed Other Columns" = Table.SelectColumns(Children1,{"Text"}),
#"Inserted Last Characters" = Table.AddColumn(#"Removed Other Columns", "Last Characters", each Text.End(Text.From([Text], "en-US"), 6), type text),
#"Changed Type2" = Table.TransformColumnTypes(#"Inserted Last Characters",{{"Text", type datetimezone}}),
#"Replaced Value" = Table.ReplaceValue(#"Changed Type2",":00",".0",Replacer.ReplaceText,{"Last Characters"}),
#"Replaced Value1" = Table.ReplaceValue(#"Replaced Value",":30",".5",Replacer.ReplaceText,{"Last Characters"}),
#"Changed Type1" = Table.TransformColumnTypes(#"Replaced Value1",{{"Last Characters", type number}, {"Text", type datetime}}),
#"Added Custom" = Table.AddColumn(#"Changed Type1", "LastRefresh", each [Text]+#duration(0,Number.From([Last Characters]),0,0)),
#"Removed Other Columns1" = Table.SelectColumns(#"Added Custom",{"LastRefresh"}),
#"Changed Type" = Table.TransformColumnTypes(#"Removed Other Columns1",{{"LastRefresh", type datetime}})
in
#"Changed Type"

  • Click Done and rename the query as “LastRefresh_API”
  • Click Close & Apply

The basic gist is that it does the following:

  • Pulls the web page and drills into the single cell we need
  • Splits off the time zone information, replacing the minutes with fractional hours and turns it into a decimal number
  • Extracts the original date/time (without the time zone) and adds the time zone offset to that value.  This essentially subtracts 7 hours from the original date for me right now
  • Performs as bit of cleanup to drill into the faked date/time we need

(If you want to use this for your time zone, I believe all you should need to do is change the “pst” portion of the URL to your time zone name.)

Create a new Last Refreshed Measure

Creating this measure is pretty much the same as the last one.

  • Go to your Report window –> New Measure –> Define it as follows:

Last Refreshed (API) = FORMAT(LASTDATE(LastRefresh_API[LastRefresh]),"mmm dd, yyyy hh:mm:ss AM/PM")

  • And create a Card visual to hold it

You should now have this odd looking contrast:

image

Great, except that… it is 3:22 PM for me, not 8:22 AM.  But fine, whatever, let’s publish this and see what happens.

Publishing to the Power BI Service

To publish the file, we take the following steps again:

  • File –> Publish –> Publish to Power BI
  • Confirm that we want to overwrite the data set
  • Login to the Power BI service and scroll down to the Datasets area
  • Click Refresh Now

At this point you might be told you can’t as you haven’t provided credentials to the data set.  Just Sign In as Anonymous and you’ll be fine:

image

And of course, now we can refresh the Report as well.  And when we do…

SNAGHTMLf308f8e

As you can see, the API version is showing the correct time here, not the Local version.

Takeaways

The biggest takeaway here is that you have to care about how your audience is using your files.  If you are going to deploy your reports by emailing *.pbix files around the company, the setting up a table using the DateTime.LocalNow() will work great.  But if you are going to publish your files to the web… that obviously throws in some wrenches.  Here’s a side by side view of those two alternatives:

SNAGHTMLf368679

Probably the most frustrating thing to me is that I was trying to find a solution that will show it correctly in BOTH Power BI Desktop and Power BI Online.  There’s nothing worse than working with a report you know is broken depending on where you look at it.  🙁

PBIX File

If you want the file so that you can try it out in your own PowerBI service… here you go.  🙂

New Vancouver Power BI User Group

I’ve been thinking about this for a while and, after discussing it with a couple of others who are passionate about Power BI…  I’m pleased to announce that we have created a new Power BI User Group in Vancouver, BC!

What is the Power BI User Group about?

The goals of this user group are fairly simple:

We plan to meet monthly, and have a presentation on using Power BI technologies.  (This could be Power BI Desktop, Excel, Power Query or Power Pivot.)  Whatever it the presentation, and no matter how focussed it is on a specific area, it will ultimately be relevant to the over-arching Power BI path of taking your data from raw form to a published dashboard.  This user group is basically dedicated to bringing you content to inspire you and make you an expert in the Power BI technologies in your company.

Our secondary goal is to be a networking group for Power BI professionals.  If you’ve ever felt like the only one in your company that actually understands what you do… well that’s why we are here.  To give you someone to swap stories with, get ideas and maybe even change your career goals.  🙂

Oh… and did I mention that another goal we have is to keep these events free for attendees?

How can you get involved?

There’s actually a few ways you can get involved with us…

If you’re looking to attend…

Then it’s simple.  Sign up at our Meetup site.  Then attend a meeting. That’s it.  No cost, no fuss.  All we ask is that you register in advance and attend if you say you’re coming.  (We have limited space in our venue right now, only able to seat about 25 people.)

If you’d like to sponsor the event…

We are looking for a sponsor to cover the cost of pizza and soft drinks for our user group attendees.  It shouldn’t be much, and we’d be happy to tell everyone how awesome your company is.  If you’d like to come on board as a sponsor, please get in touch with me via my contact form.

If you’d like to speak…

Got something cool that you’ve built using the Power BI technology stack?  Would you like to talk about how to actually get Power BI traction in a corporate environment?  Got some other relevant topic that you’re passionate about?  Come to an event and chat with us.  One of our key goals is to make sure we have good variety in our speakers!

When is the first meeting?

Great question!  We’re going to be meeting Thursday, July 14 at 5:30pm in downtown Vancouver.  I’ll be presenting on how to build this self updating Power BI dashboard which is originally sourced from PDF files.

I Need Beta Testers

Today’s post isn’t of a technical nature, although it does have a pretty long technical background… I’m now at the point where I need beta testers for a new add-in I’m planning to release.

What Does the Add-in Do?

In short, this add-in is intended to help you do two things:

  1. Inject useful Power Query scripts into your workbook.  I’m working on adding more later, but basically my vision is to provide modellers with Rapid Application Development toolsets in order to take the grunt work out of model setup, allowing you to focus on real work.
  2. Audit Power Query scripts.  If you work with Power Query today and build complex models, you’ll know that there is no easy way to trace your queries through complex models.  I also aim to fix that for you.

And one of the MAJOR design points I follow here is this:  Your end users will NOT need my add-in in order to refresh any solutions built using my tool.  All the scripts are embedded in the workbook and are completely independent of my tool.

Current Features

Here’s what the user interface looks like today:

image

Parameter Table

I use parameter tables in virtually every solution I build (as we demonstrate in Chapter 23 of M is for Data Monkey.)  For that reason, the Add Parameter Table/Query feature is one of the first I hit.  It inserts a new worksheet, adds the required table (including the formula to return the current file path), and also injects the correct queries (set up to avoid the formula firewall.)  From there, your only job is to call the fnGetParameter() where needed in your queries.

Look at all those Calendars!

There are two methods for each of the calendars, but both are predicated off a core concept.  We inject a table into your workbook where you can control the key properties using the Excel formulas you know and love:

image

We also automatically inject the required Power Query scripts, and even link it to a worksheet or into Power Pivot’s data model, if you choose that option.  The “Pre-Defined Columns” version just loads a calendar with the columns we choose, the “Dynamic Columns” also inserts a Excel table which allows you to toggle which columns you want to include (and allows you to change your mind at any time.)

I’ve put a LOT of time into building these up to try and cover the most frequently used columns.  I know there are still some holes (like ISO week numbers and InCurrentPeriod for the 4-4-5 variants), but hopefully you’ll find them useful anyway.  Believe me when I tell you that this will be WAY more efficient than trying to write these yourself.

Copy Queries

This adds a quick interface to copy queries from one workbook to another:

image

 

Show Load Destinations

Ever wonder where your queries end up?  This view helps indentify where the loading end points are for your queries:

image

Trace Precedents/Dependents

This is something that I have found particularly useful so far.  There is still a LOT more I want to do with it, but as it stands today this tool will help you walk through the various queries to see what feeds into a query and where it goes; something that can only be done via reading your M code manually today.  Here’s a view of the dependency tracker, which shows all dependent queries, right through to the data model/worksheet table that it lands in:

image

 

Supported Excel Versions

This tool has been designed to run in both 32 and 64 bit versions of Excel 2016.  I know, you want it for 2010/2013, and so do I.  The challenge is that there aren’t any hooks into Excel that I can use to do this in 2010/2013.  It’s a bummer, but I don’t ever see that changing.  🙁

Anyway… I need beta testers!

I’m looking for a small crew of beta testers for this product.  But there are some requirements:

  1. You MUST have Excel 2016 (I’m actually interested in both subscription and non-subscription users here.)
  2. I need to know your Excel “bitness” (found under File –> Account –> About  Excel

image

In addition, by participating, you are acknowledging/agreeing that:

  1. You understand that this is BETA software and USE IT AT YOUR OWN RISK.  (I.e. run it on a backup copy of your workbook, not your main one!)
  2. You’ll submit any bugs you find to me so I can fix them. 🙂
  3. I have the rights to say yes/no to your inclusion based on my reasons/whims/whatever and I don’t have to disclose what they are.

Understand that my basic goal here is to get a good cross section of systems to test on.

What do you get?

Access to the add-in and any updates I release for at least a year.  I am looking at making a free/pro version, so you’d be entitled to the pro version.

How do you sign up?

UPDATE:  I'm closing this offer at this point, as I believe I've got a good cross section in the comments section.  Watch this blog to see when I release a public version.

Leave a comment below with the following info:

  • Your Excel SKU (found in File –> Account (this could be Office Pro Plus, Microsoft Office 365 ProPlus, or something else.  It’s found right under the big Office logo on that page)
  • Your Office “bitness”
  • Your operating system

Do NOT post your email.  I can access those through the blog control panel, and don’t want you getting spammed.

How do you know if I said yes?

I’ll email you and let you know.  🙂

32 Bit Excel Memory Limit Increase!

So this is just huge, especially if you work with Power Pivot models and are stuck in 32 bit Excel… Microsoft has just released a 32 bit Excel Memory Limit increase for users of Excel 2016, effective build 16.0.6868.2060 (which is the current build for the Insiders program.)

image

UPDATE:  Effective June 7, 2016 (and build 15.0.4833.1000), there is now a patch available for Excel 2013 (both MSI and subscription versions).  More info here:  https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/3115162

Why a 32 Bit Excel Memory Limit increase?

Users stuck on 32 bit Excel were limited to only using 2GB of RAM for their Excel/Power Pivot models, no matter how much memory was available on the PC.  The answer to this in the past was to install the 64 Bit version  of Excel, as that could address up to 8 TB  of memory (if you had it, of course.)

There has been a hack/patch available for a while, (see below,) and I spoke to a user at the PASS BA summit who told me that without that he simply couldn’t use Power Query at all.

How big an increase is it?

Before you start thinking that you’ll now get the same memory access as with 64 bit Excel, let’s disabuse you of that notion.  It’s better, but not parity.  How much you get actually depends on the bitness of your operating system.

  • 32 bit Windows:  up to 3 GB
  • 64 bit Windows:  up to 4 GB

I suspect the first is an operating system limit and that the second is probably more of an internal architecture decision.  The world needs to move to 64 bit, but this will help give companies (even more) time to make that move.

What about non-Power applications?

This change doesn’t just benefit Power Pivot and Power Query; it benefits anyone who has been running into memory constraints.  So if you’ve been running out of memory because you’ve been pushing huge data sets via VBA/SQL, you’ll love this too.

How about Excel 2010/2013?

Yeah, no.  Sorry.  This is part of the benefit of being current… Microsoft is building for the current version of Office.  Excel’s biggest competitor is previous versions of Excel, so by providing a fix like this to a prior versions they’d actually be giving you reasons NOT to upgrade.  You’re in business, and I’m sure you understand that – as much as this sucks for you right now – you’d probably make the same call.

Having said that, if you want to install “the patch” to get your access in previous version, Rob Collie has a link to it in point 3 of this article.

The “Official Word” from Microsoft…

You can find that be reading KB3160741 for more details.

Newly added Power Query specific help forum at Excelguru

I'm honestly not sure what's taken me so long to do this, but I'm pleased to say that I've finally added a Power Query specific help forum at Excelguru.  I'm hoping that this forum becomes THE place to ask and answer Power Query (or Get and Transform) related questions for both Excel and Power BI desktop.  After all, we wrote the book, so it only makes sense that we try and host the Q&A on the topic.  🙂

Extra monitoring of the Power Query Specific help forum

As the forum gets up and running there are a couple of key people I've added for email notification as well.  The intent here is that we get notified when people post questions, and will try to focus on making sure that they get addressed and (hopefully) solved.  If you are a Power Query expert and would like to be included in that list, just email me or post on this thread.  I'll get you set up.  (Make sure you've signed up for an account on the site, as I'll need your user ID to do this.)

Naturally, if you've got a question pertaining to the topic posted on the blog, you can still ask it here.  If the question is a bit more general though, I'd encourage you to sign up at www.excelguru.ca/forums and post the question in the Power Query forum.

Re-focusing on the Power Technologies

While I was setting this up, I also took the time to set up forums specific forums for some of the other "Power" stack:

Hope to see you there!

Live Power Query and Power Pivot Training in Melbourne: Next week!

I know that this comes with limited notice but… as many of you know I'm currently in Sydney, Australia, and I'll be in Melbourne in a couple of days for Excel Summit South.  Well, as it happens, I'm actually staying in Melbourne for another week to deliver some live Power Query and Power Pivot training for a client.

Well guess what… we still have a bit of room, so we are going to open it up to the general public.  If you're interested in a full day of hands on training on either Power Pivot or Power Query, check out what we are doing at Parity Analytic's website, or download the individual brochures here:

(Registration information is included in the links above)

I'm very much looking forward to being able to share with a few more people, and hopefully you can be one!